Forum Posts

ckim2
Oct 18, 2019
In WORKING GROUP
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1ghUqltt67RG9_8JkucL4coRpjg7eqKEFQvV-i8zqvQQ/edit?usp=sharing
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ckim2
Mar 04, 2019
In WORKING GROUP
@tweaver @jmartinez @demery @dpasst @Dana I. Objectives for HAB unit a. By the end the unit, participants will be able to... -Name 3 ways the human-animal bond affects their clients. -Define emotional support animals, service animals, and pets. -Name the benefits and liabilities of the human-animal bond, as they related to DV and homeless services clients. -Identify signs of healthy and unhealthy human-animal relationships. II. Format for HAB training a. Using storytelling as a means of teaching. Storytelling examples: -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRtCdgWcLSI&t=60s -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JMRYaUSqnE -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm2U6KaqSkE -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLVtwC25VqA&t=116s b. Case Studies -Written and auditory case studies from real-life examples -Give training participants an opportunity to think through how they would handle these situations. -Use a combination of positive video and then challenging case study to highlight both benefits and liabilities of animal companionship. III. Next Steps a. Jasmine will write out 2 case study examples from St. Anne's. Will send to Christine by March 25. b. Next Collaborative meeting: Monday, March 25th at 12:30pm PT / 2:30pm ET
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ckim2
Feb 11, 2019
In WORKING GROUP
@tweaver @jmartinez @demery @dpasst @Dana I. Order of our staff training materials a. human-animal bond b. property/facility management (maintaining the unit, supporting the client, etc.) c. co-sheltering start-up manual II. Principles of "Andragogy" a. Autonomy and control: As a general rule, adults need to be involved in planning their instruction and evaluating their results. They should be provided with an environment in which mistakes are safe, expected and a basis for continued learning, in keeping with a problem-centered approach to new ideas. b. Purpose driven: For the most part, adults have little time to learn new content for its own sake. Instead, they are interested in approaching tasks directly related to their occupation. To thrive in most learning environments, they must be clear on how each lesson fits into their goals for self-advancement. c. Readiness to learn: From an early age, children are conditioned to recognize educators as authority figures who have broad-based power to tell them what to do, when and how. By contrast, adults expect that even the most credentialed expert will behave as a partner to them in a participative learning journey. Adult learners relate to online instructors and eLearning course designers as peers, since they’re fellow adults. They rarely hold them in awe or derision like kids do with their teachers. Keep online training material relevant and task based to tap into their openness and interest. III. The ADDIE Model for instructional design a. Analysis: Determine if training is appropriate, and define requirements for the training b. Design: Define objectives, build out the program and choose the methods and media c. Development: Conduct pilot courses using all materials in accordance with objectives d. Implementation: Implement ‘version 1’ of the training, evaluate it and refine it e. Evaluation: Perform evaluation at key milestones to ensure goals are being met. IV. Design of Unit 1 a. Unit Title: Human-Animal Bond -lessons: 1) HAB in general, 2) homelessness. 3) DV b. Objectives: By the end the unit, participants will be able to... -Name 3 ways the human-animal bond affects their clients. -Define emotional support animals, service animals, and pets. -Name the benefits and liabilities of the human-animal bond, as they related to DV and homeless services clients. -Identify signs of health and unhealthy human-animal relationships. c. Methods -Brainstorm notes: -interactive environment -brevity -impactful content, connected to the actual population -connect to the statistics and research -lively delivery -engaging -instructor must have certain level of expertise -ONLINE to account for busy work schedules and independent study -Instructional methods that might match: -Case study or Mini case (to connect to the actual population we serve) -Lecture (by an engaging expert) -Role play or simulation d. Media -formatting for both large group training and independent work -Fear Free videos -feedback loop, making sure they can ask questions (ex. Meeting Pulse) V. Next Meeting Date: Monday March 4, 9 - 10AM PT / 12 - 1PM ET
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ckim2
Jan 04, 2019
In WORKING GROUP
@Dana @tweaver @jmartinez @demery In Attendance: Danielle Emery (URI), Jasmine Martinez (St. Anne's), Tanita James (Weingart), Dana Teel (My Dog Is My Home), Christine Kim (NYC Mayor's Office) I. Review of last working group highlights Identified individual working group members' needs in staff training and resources: St Anne's: 1) Developing a strong network of outside resources, 2) Clear policies and procedures (example - Community Veterinary Outreach framework, tools, and resources), and 3) Promote education of laws regarding service/emotional support animals and how to distinguish them from pets; Urban Resource Institute: 1) Making non-dedicated staff become more invested in animal-related challenges either through training or providing more resources, 2) Training on the human/animal bond, and 3) Training on co-sheltering overall. Three identified projects and assignments: Emotional support animals: Jasmine Trainings about the human-animal bond: Danielle Co-sheltering overall: Tony & Christine **Are there existing resources that might fulfill the above needs? II. Emotional Support Animals, Service Animals, and Pets Found definitions, but there is a changing need at St. Anne's to focus more on how to mitigate property damage. Common problems: dogs urinating and defecating on the carpet in side rooms. Smell and stains cause property damage and replacement when tenant moves out. Consider following action steps: Remove carpet Offer pet care supplies Make the grassy area a compelling place for people to take their dogs Pet Care 101 training by an animal professional for clients III. Trainings about the human-animal bond Existing trainings about HAB take format of long webinars. The format doesn't work for busy homeless service professionals. Codified trainings are also geared towards the veterinary community, training them on how to care about the human end of the leash. Some existing infographics are cools, but don't actually meet our group's training needs. Free Free has a "Happy Homes" section with some training materials and packaged videos. Danielle is planning on paying for a membership and exploring the training materials. Ideal training materials on the human-animal bond: Tightly packaged Direct Accessible Geared towards human service professionals. 5-10 minute animated videos with handouts. IV. Trainings and other resources on co-sheltering overall Existing materials fall into three categories (domestic violence, natural disasters, homelessness). These have been vetted, although all of them have their limitations. Christine and Tony will have to go through with a fine toothed comb to see how to transform these materials into trainings that are relevant and appropriate for Collaborative members. Domestic Violence Allie Phillips – SAF-T webinar Allie Phillips – SAF-T manual URI white paper Natural Disasters Ready.gov Best Practice document – Shelter Operations: Pet-Friendly Shelters Homelessness National Alliance to End Homelessness, Low-Barrier Shelter: How to Become Pet Friendly webinar National Alliance to End Homelessness, Transitioning to a Low-Barrier and Pet-Friendly Shelter Model: Catholic Charities Santa Rosa case study My Dog Is My Home provides customized trainings. Trainings and materials are not available widely to the public. Must be scheduled in advance. Examples of training modules include: (1) animal health and hygiene routines/practices, (2) basic animal behavior and body language, (3) safe interactions with animals, (4) addressing animal abuse and neglect, (5) transitioning clients with pets and ESAs to permanent housing. V. Next working group meeting Monday, February 4, 2019 9 - 10AM PT / 12 - 1PM ET Conference Call
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ckim2
Dec 07, 2018
In WORKING GROUP
@jmartinez @tweaver @demery @Dana I. Introductions (In attendance: Tony Weaver, Jasmine Martinez, Danielle Emery, Christine Kim, Andrew Shkreli) II. Review of last all group meeting decisions Chair: Tanita James from Weingart Administrative Support: Dana Teel & Christine Kim Steps: 1) Identify individual members’ needs, 2) identify available resources, 3) identify holes and resources to fill gaps III. Goal Statement: Our goal is to develop resources and staff training content in order to encourage effective practices in co-sheltering programs. IV. Working group schedule Official working group conference calls 1x per month between larger Collaborative meetings. Telephone and email check-ins as needed, as projects/tasks develop. V. Individual members' needs: St Anne's: 1) Developing a strong network of outside resources, 2) Clear policies and procedures (example - Community Veterinary Outreach framework, tools, and resources), and 3) Promote education of laws regarding service/emotional support animals and how to distinguish them from pets. Urban Resource Institute: 1) Making non-dedicated staff become more invested in animal-related challenges either through training or providing more resources, 2) Training on the human/animal bond, and 3) Training on co-sheltering overall. VI. Three identified projects and assignments: Emotional support animals: Jasmine Trainings about the human-animal bond: Danielle Co-sheltering overall: Tony & Christine **Are there existing resources that might fulfill the above needs? VII. Next meeting Monday, Jan 7, 2019 9 AM Pacific / 12 PM Eastern Christine will send conference call line
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ckim2
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